KELOIDS and Today’s Top Treatments


KELOIDS are a type of scar that results from an overgrowth of collagen type tissue at the site of a healed skin injury.  Keloids can be firm, rubbery lesions or shiny, fibrous nodules that vary in color….some are pink, others are flesh colored, or they may be red to dark brown in color.  Keloids are benign (not cancerous), are not contagious but often cause severe itching and changes in skin texture.  Severe keloids can affect movement of the skin.

Keloids require expert attention to deal with the pain, itching and physical disfigurement.

Keloids are often confused with “hypertropic scars.”  They are not the same. Hypertropic scars are raised and they do NOT grow beyond the boundaries of the original wound.

Since I have specialized training and years of experience in surgery and reconstructive surgeries, I have dealt with so many patients in need of Keloid removal and scar revision…I couldn’t begin to number them.  Just know, that dealing with Keloids is serious business and you should see a surgeon with expertise in this area…in order to get desirable results.

Keloids and where they develop on the body.  Keloids can develop any place an abrasion (injury) has occurred.  They can even result from pimples, insect bites, scratching ones self, from burns or other skin trauma.  They can develop post surgery.  They most commonly occur:

  • On the central chest
  • The back & shoulders
  • On Ear lobes
  • On arms & over the collar bone after body piercings
  • From shaving…razor bumps may become keloids
  • Bottom of feet
  • Can occur at any age…but generally don’t until past age 11
  • Keloids…may be linked to hereditary tendencies

COMMON TREATMENTS FOR KELOID REMOVAL

1)  Corticosteroid injected directly into the tissue – typically 3-4 treatments spaced about 1 month apart – will reduce a raised Keloid to a flat scar and reduce redness, itching and burning.

2)  Surgical Removal is used for larger, more extensive formations.  Technique involved may employ a scalpel, electric knife or laser removal.

3) Post-Surgical Complimentary Treatments are often used to minimize Keloid recurrence after surgical removal.  These treatments include:   -silicone sheet dressings applied directly to the skin around the incision; -compression therapy the mechanically flatten the scar formation, – topical imiquimod or advanced injectables such as bleomycin,  -interferon or 5-fluorouracil.  These drugs work at the cellular level to disable the Keloid tissue formation process.

4)  Laser Excision followed by monthly intralesional steroid injections alone or in conjunction with imiquimod.

These are my treatment preferences. I stay with the tried and true because those options are proven to get the most desirable results.

Stay well, remember the Sun Screen, lots of pure drinking Water, Sun Glasses and avoid the sun’s glare, especially when near a body of water.

Steven Davison M.D.

DAVinci….where I combine the supreme elements of art and surgical science.”

Lipomatosis…nobody wants it….many people get it…one simple “squeeze technique” can remove it in 30 seconds!


LIPOMATOSIS…is the presence of multiple lipomas on the body.  Lipomas are adipose tumors….these are tumor growths filled with mature fat cells.  Lipomatosis is also referred to as: liposis or adiposis.  Whatever it is called…it simple means an abnormal localized tumor like accumulation of fat in the tissues.  Many discrete, encapsulated lipomas form on the body trunk and extremities with very few on the head.  In 1993, a genetic defect within lipomas was localized to chromosome 12q15, where the HMGIC gene encodes the high-mobility-group protein isoform 1-C.  This is one of the most commonly found mutations in solitary lipomatous tumors, while lipomas often have multiple mutations.  Other chromosomes have also been observed.

Other entities often accompanied by multiple lipomas include Proteus syndrome, Cowden syndrome and related disorders due to PTEN gene mutations, benign symmetric lipomatosis (Madelung disease), familial lipodystrophy, hibernomas and familial angiolipomatosis.  Below I outline some symptoms….because more people are presenting today with lipomas….it is important to educate on this subject.

SYMPTOMS of FAMILIAL LIPOMATOSIS (FML)…FML is a rare disorder that tends to run in families and affects both men and women.  It is hereditary and shows up as groups of fat cells in the subcutaneous tissues that begin to grow and produce multiple fatty lumps of “benign” fatty tumors (lipomas).

  • Usually appear on the abdomen, arms, thighs, neck
  • Can also appear on the face, buttocks, lower legs
  • Tend to vary widely in size…& may or may not be surrounded by connective tissue
  • May or may not be attached to the skin & nearby muscle
  • They are rubbery, moveable & ovoid to round in shape
  • Are not usually painful (unless in an irritated area)
  • Can appear singularly or in clusters
  • Typically appear during of soon after adolescence
  • Extreme cases can grow to appear grotesque & can interfere with mobility, movement & cause disfigurement

LIPOMA REMOVAL REQUIRES THE SKILLS OF A QUALIFIED SURGEON…LIPOMA cases are nearly always referred to a surgeon who is skilled and qualified in their removal.

My previous blog covered methods of Lipoma’s removal…surgical excision, endoscopic removal, liposuction and a simple “squeeze” technique I have developed that safely and effectively removes many lipomas within just seconds through a small incision.

LIPOMATOSIS….NOBODY WANTS IT…WE CAN DEAL WITH IT!  If you, a friend or loved one has been suffering with Lipomas.  Please know there is help!  Come in and let’s get your treatment plan going so you can be free again.

OK….MY NEXT BLOG WILL COVER KELOIDS….THEN WE’LL GET OFF THIS TRACK AND GET BACK INTO BEACH BODY TOPICS!

HOPE EVERYONE IS HAVING A WONDERFUL SPRING!

Steven Davison M.D.

“DAVinci….where I combine the supreme elements of art and surgical science.”

IS IT THIS ONE…OR IS IT THAT ONE?


A quite frequent problem involved in the removal of small lesions such as moles, nevi and other lesions is…correct identification.  Correct identification and confirmation of the exact site for these small lesions is paramount.  But often, this is a problem when a patient is referred from a dermatologist and presents in our office.

Identification and Clinical Notes The most common way of locating and identifying the correct site is by asking the patient to identify the site in conjunction with clinic notes.  This method is used to help maximize accuracy in the ID process.  Problem is…this can backfire.

I’ve actually had a patient blow up at me when I asked them to confirm which mole the dermatologist wanted biopsied.  But there is an easy solution to this problem.

Smart Phone’s High Pixel Camera! The Smart Phone’s high pixel camera does not require additional lighting, so you can take a photo in the dermatologist’s office without hassle.  Here are the steps I recommend:

  1. Take a photo (or have someone on staff do it)…of the marked lesion.
  2. Include a frame of reference – e.g. the nose, right ear, left ear, belly button – something discernible.
  3. If the lesion is hard to find, include a ruler located by the lesion so we can measure from the landmark.
  4. This prevents hours of anguish caused from having to revisit the dermatologist and from incorrect lesion biopsy mistakes.

Be thankful for modern technology…quite amazing!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Dr. Steven Davison